Posts Tagged ‘lovecraft’

Some somewhat banal updates about things I’m working on: 1 – For the Of Monsters, and Miracles conference at my home university of Western I am completing a piece called “A Weird Posthumanism” which is on Lovecraft and Luciana Parisi as making a kind of proto posthumanism together with their biological articulations of early planetary […]


At Hypertiling (a blog I should check more frequently) Fabio mentions his ambivalence towards the Lovecraftian tendency amongst the speculative nihilists – a group I would argue includes myself, Reza, Eugene Thacker, Nicola, Evan Calder Williams, SC Hickman, and probably others I am forgetting. My engagement with fictional forms of darkness my seem too hyperbolic […]


Dark Errata

16Dec10

Just wanted to link to SC Hickman’s blog Dark Chemistry which has many very interesting posts on Lovecraft, Negarestani, Lovecraft, Cioran and others. The program for the Animal, Vegetable, Mineral, and Ethics conference hosted by George Washington Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute is now online. Unfortunately the first day conflicts with the Cyclonopedia event […]


The statement “What is that?” indexes the horror of the weird (or the weirdness of horror) in at least 7 dimensions. /1/ – ‘What’ is the epistemological dimension of horror or the very questioning of the identity of the creature or thing before the thinking entity subject to horror. Whatness assumes possibly belonging to a […]


Michael ends a post partially in response¬† to my last post that nature isn’t terrifying. Many of my posts here would seem to assert exactly the opposite – that a darkly vitalistic nature is a horrible monstrousity – but this darkness is a darkness for us and not in itself. This was suggested in comments […]


The alchemist term azoth stretches from the beginning to the end in its etymological roots and unites cohesion and corrosion.¬† This term may have inspired Lovecraft’s gibbering monstrosity known as Azathoth.¬† This blind idiot god, I argue, is somewhere between or perhaps an interpenetration of Oken’s Zero and Plotinus’ One.


One of the most unfortunate constants of science fiction is its humanistic optimism whether secular or mythic. The unification of planets, of empires and rebellions asserts a communitarian harmony as well as a ubiquity of civilized life. The post-apocalyptic and the dying earth subgenres offer some hope of desolation and pessimism but often relapse into […]



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