Archive for the ‘Copjec’ Category

The post was partially inspired by Sarah Marshall‘s piece Beyond Clarice at the Hairpin. I’ve mentioned several times that I have the fantasy of retreating to a cabin somewhere, watching an egregious amount of horror films (though I wonder how many one has to watch as I’ve already seen around 200), and writing a book […]


If sexual difference has been relegated to symbolic functions, and to speech in particular, how is the masculine to survive, as exceptional in the above formulation, without simply resorting to a flaccid internalization as it seems to have done in the figure of the dumb husband? To connect this to the cultural (and to a […]


Katerina Kolozova’s The Real and the “I” is a brilliant text which complicates Francois Laruelle’s non-philosophy with post-structuralist feminist theory, psychoanalysis, and various continental philosophies. Like Brassier’s Nihil Unbound, Kolozova’s project is a heretical reading of Laruelle’s philsopy which, while maintaining the basic tenets of his system (unilateral duality, vision in one, the Real, transcendence […]


Several points in the post are indebted to discussions here and here. Derrida’s notion of language play and the purported death of the transcendental signifier seems to have anchored narratology, as it is understood in cultural studies and many veins of literary studies, in the swamp of post-structuralism. Furthermore, the phenomenological and post-Kantian articulation of […]


/1/ – Zizek in Love Previously, I have discussed the following, but while the initial concerns are the same, the passage thereafter diverges greatly. At the start of Astra Taylor’s Zizek!, the manic philosopher, clearly over heated, explains how love is “formally evil.” Zizek points out that in love, a subject picks out another imperfect […]


/1/ – Kant’s Nightmare? The question that (arguably) haunted Kant, that, according to some critics he could not face, was the possibility of radical evil. For Kant, evil is, in the most general sense, when one chooses their will over the moral law. It is when pathological or self-interest overcomes our sense of duty, of […]


/1/ – Cavernous Bodies Neil Marshall’s horror film The Descent is interesting for a number of reasons. For one, the movie is almost completely devoid of male characters nor is there is any of the juvenile ‘sexing up’ of the film’s female cast. Here is the film’s synopsis from IMDB: “After a tragic accident, six […]



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