In the Dark Choir

10Jun09

I can not but agree with Alex’s sentiments, Levi’s comment as well as Reza’s and Graham’s bits of support.  Even as I look over at my bookcase which houses no less than 17 books by or about Badiou, I must join in the call of betrayal.  Of course all kinds of Lacanian things can be said about myself or anyone who saw Badiou as the possible ‘one to save us’  For many young philosophers though, Badiou represented an exodus from the land of deconstruction (a country of pure salt and rubble) and promised great constructions, political aspirations outside the state and a future re-enchanted by thought.  What sealed Badiou’s fate in my mind was when he said, to a fellow EGSer, that the brain was ‘merely a tool of man.’

As equally disheartening as Badiou’s sterility is his remoteness – the construction of his philosophy as always at a distance – not only a distance in terms of his time (as distinctly modern) but the mathematic distance from thought itself to say nothing about the sick churning of materality.

Mark and Dominic reply to Alex.

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6 Responses to “In the Dark Choir”

  1. Perhaps someone will actually post a sustained critique of Badiou, instead of chirping around posting how it is ‘piling nonsense over nonsense’ and speaking about the ‘minimalist elegance’of his architectonic as if it this was a text oriented variant of Pitchfork.com, assessing works by the relative merits of a generalized popular aesthetic appreciation. I think Michael puts it best: if one is going to speak about ‘jumping the ship’ then at least offer something by way of an argument.

    Ray Brassier’s chapter on Badiou raises an interesting objection as regards the status of metaontology and the possibility of speaking of non-ontological presentation, seeing that the latter seems substrative in being’s inconsistency, while ordinary situations ascribe to the being of the one and consistency. But it seems a free copout to leave it like that: the price to pay in realism concerning its suspect inertia in politics and its lack of a theory of change (which was Badiou’s own remark apropos speculative realism).

    As for the question ‘what can we do with Badiou’, I find that Logics of Worlds does provide solid ground to topologize political situations; I provide a fragment of a concrete situation seen through Badiou’s formal typology of subjectivation.


  1. 1 a further defection « Object-Oriented Philosophy
  2. 2 The Banality of Badiou… « Frames /sing
  3. 3 Poetix » Blog Archive » Defeatists! Renegades! Fascists!
  4. 4 Badiou and (the future of) philosophy « Complete Lies.
  5. 5 transversalinflections

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